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Notes From The Road – A Talk With “Good Field” Frontman Paul Price

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NewsWhistle recently had the opportunity to have an e-conversation with Good Field’s lead singer Paul Price.

For those of you who don’t know Good Field… Good Field is a trip, like a road trip through the desert.

Let the Austin, TX band’s latest, Future Me, be your guide on your night-bound journey. Stamp out the campfire, and get into the van. Put your trust in Good Field. They know where you are headed.

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Chad Werner: If I told you that I immediately heard Camper Van Beethoven in Future Me, would that be a) spot on  b) way off, but cool nonetheless  c) utterly offensive?  Why?

Paul Price: “B” – although I see how some comparisons could be made.

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Paul

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CW: I hear Good Field’s music as playing on a dusty desert road trip. Singer/songwriter Matthew Ryan has talked about “humidity” being part of some his music.  Into what climate do you place Future Me?

PP: Actually, dusty desert road trip is great.  Pretty much right on.

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Good Field is Paul, Kyle Robertson (keys), Esteban Cruz (drums), and Michael McLeod (bass).

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CW. There is an even-ness to the whole album.  The throttle doesn’t really open up until the last track, “Do It,” and even then there is an overarching laid-back vibe to it.  Intentional, or did it just sort of happen as a result of the band’s personalities?

PP: I think a little of both.  As soon as we started playing together we found ourselves returning to consistent rhythm section parts that we thought felt good being played repetitively over a long period of time.  I think that creates the even, laid-back vibe you are talking about.

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CW: Back in the 90s, I read what I thought was a putdown of a 10,000 Maniacs album, “Shhh, they’re playing rock and roll.” I am older now, and regardless of what the author meant back then about the Maniacs, I am not sure it is a negative when used to describe the right band.  How does it apply to Good Field, if at all?

PP: We are a rock band, but we don’t create music that is pure raw energy like the Stooges or MC5 (even though we love that music).  There are moments of raw energy in the songs, but it only lasts for a portion of each song.  The rest of the song focuses on more of a pop structure that pays attention to hooks, transitions, and how a song is pieced together.  Perhaps the pop elements in the songs make it less appropriate to go primal.

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CW: Future Me came out a few months ago, how did the shows behind it go? New shows upcoming?

PP: We made a trip up the East Coast to New York and back this past July/August.  The shows were great, especially in New York where we have always been treated really well.  Here is a list of new shows we have coming up:

10/16/15 ABGB                                    Austin, TX             w/ Bop English
11/15/15 Harvest Fest                         Denton, TX
11/21/15 Hill Country Farm Fest       San Marcos, TX

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CW: I love the album cover for Future Me.  Is there a relationship of it to the lyrics at all?

PP: In my mind there is a broad relationship.  Future Me has a lot to do with peoples’ lives changing, and how it relates to time and overseeing the big picture.  The planets depicted on the album artwork, designed by our drummer Esteban Cruz, give you a bigger perspective of what exists outside our own personal lives.  The planets look down at you and time seems so much slower to them.  They also deal with their own relationships as they pull closer and push further from each other.  Eventually, even their relationships will stop existing, so they have to cherish the moments they have.

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CW: The lyrics to the song “Future Me” are interesting.  Is the protagonist simply asking for his lover back, or is he suggesting that this lover can see his “future me,” and maybe this is the person is worthy of the lover’s attention?  It feels like something more is going on.

PP: I think of the song as a way to look at time and relationships.  It’s hard to tell what amount of time a relationship will exist in your life.  It’s also difficult to decipher the quality vs. quantity a relationship will have as an impact on you.

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All images courtesy of Good Field. For more information about the band, visit their site: http://goodfieldband.com/

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NewsWhistle music contributor Chad Werner is “ahead of the curve, behind the times.” You can contact this rock n’ roll sphinx at chad@newswhistle.com (e-mail) or @scooternotmoped (Twitter).